Tag Archives: Foxcatcher

Who’s the Catcher, Who’s the Fox….

dupontilluminatieyeSometimes my wife absolutely hates watching movies with me. This is not her fault, of course, and I have been making a conscious effort over the last couple of years to curtail my internal reactions to things on the screen which to me seem like a perfectly good rabbit trail on which to go off on some rant about the “deep state” or “black ops” or whatever else. Fellas, your lady doesn’t want to spend date night listening to you talk about the New World Order. Somehow, this does not seem relevant her desire to cultivate intimacy with you.

And so, this is why when watching “Foxcatcher” last night, which largely takes place on the estate of John E. Dupont, I think I managed to only make onelittle comment about the Duponts being a major Illuminati-bloodline family. There was a scene where Steve Carrell (who plays John Dupont) is standing on the property telling his new wrestling recruit about the grounds, how certain battles of the Revolutionary War were fought right across the field, and there is this shot where they are standing there looking across this picturesque New England landscape, standing beside an Egyptian obelisk. A veritable mini-Washington monument, in all it’s American-blue-blood, phallic glory. It was just too perfect of a picture not to point it out… 🙂

The film itself was admittedly quite well made. The acting was unarguably top notch, Carrell putting in a performance which really demonstrated how committed to a role he can be, exuding a subtle creepiness in a character that truly did not feel like it was rehashing anything I’d ever seen before in a villain. The entire film maintains a very eerie, brooding tone, from start to finish, with a character-driven realism that is indeed rare in movie-making these days. Mark Ruffalo gave an equally stellar performance as Dave Schultz, creating a perfect contrast to Carrell’s portrayal of Dupont. You can’t help but start to like the character of big brother Dave from the start. Mentor, father-figure, training partner to Mark, family man with his priorities in order, a down-to-Earth guy who’s ego doesn’t ever get the best of him. The longer the movie goes on, the more you feel yourself dreading the eventual conclusion. Dupont, on the other hand, isn’t terribly likeable from the get-go, and as things progress his character only becomes more pathetic and tragic.

The widow of Dave Schultz has gone on record saying that the movie is incredibly accurate in it’s depiction of the events, and I don’t doubt that in most ways it is, from a certain perspective. Apparently younger brother Mark has expressed strong objections to being portrayed as having had illicit relations with Dupont, as is inferred in the movie with things like a scene of the rich benefactor knocking on his window in the middle of the night, and calling him to the mansion for a one-on-one “wrestling workout” under the watchful eyes of old Dupont family portraits. It’s hard to say exactly what the nature of that relationship was, but it seems reasonable to leave such dynamics as being quite open to possibility. Even if it was true, I can appreciate why the real Mark Schultz wouldn’t relish the idea of having such a thing recreated in cinematic form. They movie actually does a remarkable job of subtly portraying the inner pain and guilt that Mark increasingly carries, even though he never really uses words to tell anyone, even his brother Dave. However true-to-life that aspect of the film was, it was definitely a very emotionally moving arc to travel alongside of, and seeing the way that Dave never stopped loving and supporting his brother through it all, even though you’re never quite sure how much of Dupont’s unhealthy control over Mark he’s able to piece together. Perhaps if he had, he wouldn’t have stayed on at Foxcatcher Farms as a wrestling coach even after Mark had to leave…

On the other hand… Every time I watch anything anymore, I am constantly asking myself “What are the underlying narratives going on here? What lies behind the more obvious story, and connects to something deeper?”

Well, if the testimony of Jay Parker is in fact true, there is indeed a whole lot more to the story.

The film portrays John Dupont as an aging silver-spooned narcissist who turns to the sport of wrestling as a means of trying to free himself from his personal dynastic demons, using his financial sway to create a fictional, self-deluded identity as a “mentor” and “leader of men” to young, physical athletes. That much is almost certainly not made-up, but in the video below, starting at about the 22:30 mark, Jay explains that as a member of an Illuminati family himself, his mother was actually recruited as a mind-control programmer to construct a certain manner of Monarch programming on John Dupont, one of her students, in order to eventually trigger him into committing an act that would land him in a psychiatric hospital, and give them access to the massive family inheritance that was his.


The whole interview is actually pretty interesting, if you want to listen to the whole thing where he talks about everything from eugenics to satanic ritual abuse, then I’d say it’s pretty interesting, and quite relevant, but the part specifically dealing with John Dupont is about ten minutes, from about 22:30 to 32:00.

If this is true, then a film such a Foxcatcher immediately starts to take on a radically different tone. As Jay says in the interview, “those who are raised being exposed to pedophilia and human sacrifice, are quite likely to grow up being pedophiles and human-sacrificers themselves”… Of course, the claims of a person like Parker are not iron-clad proof, and we should not treat it as such, but I do whole-heartedly believe that they should not be laughed-off either.

The more you listen to testimonies such as his, the more you will slowly hear a continuity to the kinds of things he is describing, a cohesion to these kinds of accounts alleging that there are indeed rich, powerful families who practice generational Satanism on a scale that most ordinary citizens could scarcely imagine. When you start to really grasp just how massive in scope it is, and how deeply entrenched families like the Duponts are within the military-industrial complex and “Dynastic American Luciferianism”, then you can start to see how a figure like John E. Dupont could really have been a “scared little fox” himself, running through the woods from a “hunting party” the likes of which the film itself doesn’t even begin to so hint about. Perhaps that was the real point.

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