Tag Archives: the Book of Enoch

Nephilim, the Book of Enoch, and lingering questions…

Yesterday I was listening to a really interesting interview done by Derek Gilbert, who spoke with Guy Malone about the topic of the Nephilim, and how this rather peculiar topic has started to become the source of an alarming amount of contention in certain circles.  Guy’s work deals mainly with people afflicted by various elements of the UFO phenomenon, but since there has been so many people who have connected ufology and the concept of modern-day nephilim, he has ended up doing a lot of research and teaching on that issue as well.  He talks about how before he had been in a place of putting a lot of credance to the book of Enoch, making use of all the typical biblical arguments (the quote from Jude, for instance…), but now after several years has had to make some changes to his perspective.  He shares about how some Christians have actually come to the sad place of rigorously debating whether or not “modern nephilim” can be saved… (!?)  Something which honestly sounds pretty dang “out there”, even to someone like me…

Interestingly enough a lot of what he had to say about Enoch have more or less been directions that I’ve found myself gravitating towards lately as well.  I initially was really blown away when I read about the “Watchers”, and the accounts of how they married human women and created their own little kingdoms, with themselves being more or less god-kings, and how they taught mankind the arts of war, and seduction, and sorcery, and all the rest…   So in the interview Guy talks about how he’s had to go back, and rethink his acceptance of the book of Enoch as being not canonical, but still having some kind of weight.   He refers to a video he helped produce called “The Case Against the Book of Enoch”, (seen below) which I then sat down and watched.

I will say that there was a great deal of info in this presentation that I found really helpful and informative.  They go to great lengths to explain the many places where the Book of Enoch does’t jive with the Old Testament, and also spend a lot of time to show that in fact the Book of Enoch is not even needed in order to have evidence for things like the Sons of God marrying the daughters of men, their hybrid (giant) offspring, or even the judgement of the Nephilim and their fallen angel fathers as they were thrown into the Abyss. 

The section where they get into the idea of the “principle of replication” was extremely interesting as well, where they go into explaining their case for the idea that while man and woman come together to create a new life, it is from the father that the spirit is passed down from.  Though it may sound a little strange at first, such a concept really would seem to make sense when considering how the Nephilim were both partially physically human, but spiritually speaking they were as fallen as their fathers.  (It also makes a lot of sense when you think about things like the virgin birth…)

However, as I continued on through the video, and then later took some looks through more of their material online, the thing that puzzles me is that after all of this exteremely thorough treatment of Enoch, as it compares to scripture (which all sounded pretty convincing), they then go on to talk about how the nephilim that were around after the flood (such as the giants in Canaan when Joshua and the spies went in) weren’t really true “nephilim” at all, but only people who happened to inherit a recessive gene for giantism, that must have been passed down through either Noah’s wife or his daughters-in-law.  They try to explain that the true “Nephilim” and the later “Rephaim” are distinct from one another, and so how this concept of their being any true fallen-angel-descended nephilim after the flood is erroneous… 

I guess in some ways I can maybe understand why Guy might feel swayed to come to such a conclusion, particularly after bearing witness to more and more people who are now making these pretty bizarre conclusions about how the gospel doesn’t apply to certain people today because they are (or at least believe they are) modern-day nephilim…

The only thing that trips me up with this however, is the fact that when we read Genesis 6:4, it plainly says, “The Nephilim were on the earth in those days–and also afterward–when the sons of God went to the daughters of men and had children by them.”  So if the nephilim before the blood were the progeny of fallen angels and human women, then it would that you’d have to say that the same thing were somehow also around after the flood too.  (Because, well, that’s just what it says!)

One of the things that really blew my mind when I first started to take seriously the whole concept of the “Genesis 6 paradigm”, was when I started then reflecting on how so much of the ancient mythology and pagan tradition has such a large amount of “overlap” with this concept, in the sense of the massively recurring themes of “gods” and demigods all over the world, legends of giants, and tales of beings that came down from the sky and gave civilization to men, etc.  From basically that point on, I have been unable to keep myself from wondering about just how much of those myths/legends were merely hand-me-down stories from the antediluvian era (with a “pro-demonic” spin of course…), and how much of this “mythology”, the worshipping of fallen angels and demons as “gods” over a particular city/kingdom, (in a very direct way) carried over into the generations after Noah…

When you look at things such as the building of the tower of Babel, the king Nimrod and the city of Babylon, it’s hard not to see that there appears to be a very similar out working of what we think of as occurring in the pre-flood days…  And if indeed the Israelite spies were seeing true, post-flood Nephilim when surveying the land of Canaan, then it sort of begs the question, did more angels fall, after the flood, and commit the same sins as before the flood?  That seems like it would be hard to understand, after God going through such trouble to wipe out the incredible sin and the genetic corruption that had covered the earth once before…

I guess for me the element of this whole “topic” that most seems like it has actual, here-and-now implications, is basically the question of whether or not  the current “Satanic echelon” is comprised of mostly or all demon-spirits (who very well could be the spirits of the deceased Nephilim…), or if fallen angelic hosts (who can exist as both ethereal spirits, or manifest into a physical body) are still a part of the mix…

Seems like part of the reason for so much ambiguity about this matter, is the fact that people can have all sorts of “encounters” which may be only happening in a spiritual sense, but which can seem every bit as real and tangible as every day life.  This is an aspect that people like Guy Malone obviously understand all too well, and so it would seem to make it difficult to ascertain if someone was every actually seeing a physically-manifested fallen angel, or just having type of psychic experience in which they believed they were seeing one…

I’d say a big reason that I never got too worked up about the notion of “modern-day nephilim” has to do with good ol’ Ephesians 6: “For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms.”  To me, Nephilim would definitely seem to qualify as “flesh and blood”, and as such the Bible seems to negate the idea that at some point we’d have to worry about dealing with their ilk again.  Some people then of course look very closely at the whole genetic modification thing, and think that the “new” nephilim will have something to do with that, instead of the original angel-sired generation of nephilim, but I just don’t know…

One thing I really appreciated about Guy Malone’s approach to this topic, was how he went into detail on Matthew 24, and really took apart this popular notion that the phrase “As in the days of Noah, so shall it be at the coming of the Son of Man” means that there will again be Nephilim on the earth before Christ returns.  That sloppy interpretation has kind of bugged for a while, and it was good to see someone who is more “respected” in the field stand up and point that out…

Hmmmm.  I dunno….  I guess when I first came across it, the whole Nephilim thing seemed to really have a lot of significance (I guess the fact that Tom Horn was one of the first teachers I came across when researching the “NWO” probably played a part in that…), but now I’m just not quite sure what to think about it.  Maybe it’s not that significant after all.  Maybe, as the title of Derek’s interview alludes, there might be more distraction going on than any real threat…(?)

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