Tag Archives: zionism

Je ne suis pas Charlie, et toi…?

Excellent analysis of Charlie Hebdo attack, and the broader political and false flag context of Europe and the War on Terror right now by Webster Tarpley as he speaks to Jeff Rense. Lots of gems in here.

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The Order of the All-Mocking Tongue…

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So much is going on globally right now, so many pieces moving forward in the broader agenda intended via the “war on terror”, I almost find myself apathetic towards continuing to keep writing about it, dissecting it, urging people to wake up and recognize the pervasive use of false-flag attacks and the consistent message being put forth day in and day out through the mass media. 17 deaths in Paris. Political leaders marching arm in arm with scores of people in “solidarity” against terror. Now Boko Haram is once again making headlines as well, using children to carry bombs. France is deploying thousands of troops and policemen to patrol their street. Netanyahu is beckoning French Jews to come find safety in Israel. The stories of “hacking” and “cyber threats” run constantly. As many expected, we all took a nice little Christmas break from all the turmoil, and now we are back in session, seeing the Agenda move right along. My goodness is it ever moving along…

If you see it, you see it everywhere, because it is everywhere. If you don’t, it is because you won’t. You can’t. To believe such a thing transgresses a psychological line which most people still are unprepared to cross. A fellow I occasionally interact with recently encapsulated this mindset quite succinctly by saying, “Would individuals possibly kill others to consolidate and expand power money, power, and control. Sure, I’m sure it has happened. But I don’t believe that there is a vast government conspiracy to that end or that there is some secret fraternal organization of the rich and powerful that is pulling everyone’s strings.” Not trying to pick on anyone here, I hear this sort of sentiment all the time.

Do people for the most part believe in “conspiracy”? Well, yes, technically they certainly do. After all, the entire premise of the “war on terror” itself hinges upon the very belief in people organizing and plotting to carry out extremely nefarious plans. Remember the “Axis of Evil”..? We might be tempted to remember that as nothing but a Saturday Night Live parody, yet George Dubbya was quite serious that it was a real thing! But it goes even farther. Would such a thing as war in general even be possible if there was no pervasive belief in the concept that rich, powerful people over in some other part of the world were conspiring to possibly attack at any moment? Isn’t that very idea what spurred on the Cold War for decades? Doesn’t everyone already implicitly agree on the fact that Hitler and his chiefs “conspired” to take over Europe, and eradicate millions of Jews and political prisoners, before they acted? Isn’t the notion of “malicious conspiracy” by the leaders of nations such as North Korea and Iran and Russia the very reason that we are constantly told to regard them as potential dangers to our “national security”..?

Well, “Sure”, people will say, “but that is totally different from the idea of people in robes sitting in “smoke-filled rooms” decided the fate of millions, making secret, sinister oaths, and deceiving the public who believe them to be nothing more than upstanding citizens, civil servants and titans of industry…”

Simpsons_-_6x12_-_Homer_The_Great.rl 008 (1)It’s a joke to be laughed at, and has been at least since the death of JFK over fifty years ago, the “weaponization” of the term “conspiracy theory” having taken deep effect.

So essentially, we believe in the concept quite pervasively, yet only when it is being applied towards those we are told are the enemy. To believe such a thing about our own politicians, bankers, policy-makers, media moguls? Ludicrous! After all, the media outlets owned by those moguls consistently remind us of this impossibility… While the dust from the Twin Towers was still settling over Manhattan, Dubbya was reminding us not to tolerate “outrageous conspiracy theories”. How interesting. Anecdotally, I’ll just mention that when I began to learn the truth about things like “Building 7” and the rest, Bush’s comment there was one of the pieces that absolutely SCREAMED towards the sickening reality that I was suddenly being forced to digest.

But the veil of absurdity is a far more convincing ploy than many will acknowledge. Speaking of personal anecdotes, there was a time when I was struggling to let go of smoking, and I would quite regularly sneak cigarettes behind the back of my spouse, who was also trying to quit. Rather than own up to my faltering, and be forced to undergo closer daily scrutiny, I am ashamed to say that when my wife would catch a whiff of smoke on my breath, and ask if I had smoked that day, I’d scoff, and scrunch up my eyebrows as though laughing at the very idea, and lie my ass off. My little secret dug itself in deeper and deeper over time, and I quickly learned that feigning amusement at any accusations or questions was typically much more convincing that staunchly denying it directly. We all understand the principal of “The lady doth protest too much, methinks”, and I’d say that we all at some point learn the deceptive tactic of projecting dismissal and indifference to allegations, rather than granting them serious consideration. Mockery is a fundamental tool of denial, something quite rooted in our fallen human nature…lodge

And so how amusing indeed has it been, to see so many instances in pop culture where the reality of the Luciferian globalist conspiracy is mocked and parodied, and increasingly so, eird-al-yankovic-tin-foil-hatas if to try and keep in step with the growing amount of awareness that steadily increases as alternative media and the internet in general allows. The Simpsons spoofs the role of Freemasonry. Weird Al Yankovic pokes fun at tin foil hat wearers. Jim Carrey goes on Jimmy Kimmel and Saturday Night Live, mocking the concept of the Illuminati (calling it the “Illumi-nutty”) and pretending to prod Kimmel about “As if you don’t know what this symbol means”… q
“It’s the order of the All-Mocking Tongue”, he continues, making a reference to the Masonic “All-seeing Eye of Lucifer”. Everyone laughs. The interview continues, on to promoting his latest piece of Hollywood crap…

Yes, the audience keep laughing, yet the agenda rolls on. This morning I actually just sat at let CNN play, while I wrote this, made breakfast, got on with the day. I let it play, listening to the almost painful barrage of press-release-readers go ON and ON and ON about France, Nigeria, Did the U.S. make a mistake by not sending Obama to the rally in Paris, wewillkeeptalkingandtalkingtopoundthemessageofsolidarityagainstterrorismintoyourheadswhilepretendingtodebatemattersofnoultimateconsequence.

Sometimes I find it somewhat therapeutic to do this. It helps remind me of just how real and constant and unrelenting the brainwashing really is. Sometimes watching hours of CNN itself does more to convince me of the “Conspiracy” than anything else. It really takes all the effort out of trying to “put the pieces together” and figure out what the “officially-sanctioned narrative” is. It’s almost no fun anymore. (as if it’s ever “fun” to watch reports of more innocent people being killed for the sake of furthering the globalist agendas of more surveillance, more police, more war…)

Ok, I’m turning it off now…. 🙂

Never have I been prouder to be a “Futurian”…

supremecourtpyramidDr. Michael Bennett, “Doctor Future” of the much beloved Futurequake show, has recently emerged from the confines of his hobbit hole to do two interviews, the first with Tim Kilkenny on Revelations Radio News, and the second with Derek Gilbert on his show, a View from the Bunker, discussing the progress on his series of books he has been working on for some time now.  What was originally intended to be a single book exploring the “War on Terror” from a Christian/prophetic perspective has now expanded to a seven volume series, called “The Holy War Chronicles”, which now, as Bennett’s recent discussion with Derek on “Jewish Magic” shows, stands poised to be a veritable boat rocker in the realm of Christian prophetic research.

What I find so thrilling about all of this, is how Doc himself admits that the rabbit holes he eventually found himself exploring, involving things such as the modern state of Israel and the centrality of Kabbalistic occultism in the inner circles of rabbinic Judaism, were not at all a part of his original outline for the book/s, but were something he felt unable to exclude the more he followed the breadcrumbs, as it were, eventually comprising enough material to warrant an entire volume their own, after learning about things such as the prevalence of Israeli rabbis openly conducting magic and death hexes against those perceived to be their political enemies. Bennett openly speaks about how until very recently, he was very much in the conventional vein of Christian prophetic teaching which largely without question tows the line of being “pro Israel” and pro-Zionism, heralding God’s mandate that we should fully give Israel financial, political and military support, lest we find ourselves guilty of touching the “apple of His eye” etc…

I was already greatly indebted to the person of “Dr. Future” (and Tom Bionic, lest we forget, love you too Tom…) and the legacy of Futurequake, for the invaluable role they all played in my own life, providing a much needed venue for both intellectual and spiritual grounding when I found myself in the midst of a very confusing and rather vulnerable time in my life and faith. Futurequake, in many ways, blazed the trail for so many podcasters and researchers who followed, and as Bennett himself describes, now in it’s archived state also stands as a sort of testament to the progression of Mike’s thinking, a journey of discussions and interviews which over the years piece together a vast array of leads and investigations. Now, “The Holy War Chronicles” promises to lean heavily on that foundation provided by years of riveting Futurequake interviews, and charge forward into a new chapter, providing what I foresee will be an indispensable resource for other researchers, authors, teachers and students for years to come.

Having myself gone through a very similar unexpected “paradigm shift” in regards to my perspective on the broaderchaldeanmagic topic of occultism within Judaism and it’s ramifications towards the nation/state of modern Israel and Zionism less than a year ago, learning about this kind of research being done by someone like Doctor Future was truly exhilarating, not merely because I know the level of scholarship and scope of research he brings to the table, but almost more importantly, the degree of humility and softness of heart that he brings to the entire issue, putting it all in the context and framework that the topic should always be kept in, the gospel of Jesus Christ.

Standing up and being willing to challenge the status quo on a topic like Israel or Judaism in Christian circles today is one that is bound to be fraught with opposition, and even derision, as the conditioned hair-trigger accusations of “anti-Semitism” are levied, or appeals to “touch not the Lord’s anointed!” are bellowed. But this is why I see the Lord’s providential hand at work here, knowing the controversial nature of merely asking these kinds of questions, but then also knowing how well respected a figure like Dr. Bennett is, especially within the “RRN Community”, and I have to say, it will be quite interesting to see how things start to shake out, once these books are finally published and the Doc sets out to engage in discussing these matters with the many brothers and sisters who have listened to him over the years and know he is anything but motivated by racism or antipathy for his neighbor, whatever their nationality or religious upbringing might be, but rather, a sincere desire to see Christ be preached and glorified, and to see lost people found in the Light of His Love.

Examining the Eschatological Concept of “Sheep and Goat Nations”…

sheepgoatworldmapFirst I want to say that I think Dan Duval is cool guy. I first came across him over a year ago now as my podcast-addict tendencies brought me to his original online radio show called “Discovering the Truth with Dan Duval“. He talks about a lot of things, almost all of which I have found absolutely fascinating and very much in line with a lot of the topics/perspectives I have come to spend a lot of time investigating in the realm of “eschatology”, such as Genesis 6/Nephilim, mind control programming, the New World Order, spiritual realms/dimensions, water spirits and so on. His interview of former “Illumined One” Carol Hamlett is still one of my all-time favorite interviews/testimonies. Ever. It’s hard to listen to Dan Duval and not find yourself getting pumped up about Bible Prophecy. He has a gift for speaking and exhortation for sure.

One of the things I’ve heard him speak about which grabbed my attention from the beginning was the mention of this idea of “Sheep Nations”, although until quite recently I never was able to get a very clear grasp of just what it was all about. He’s written a book called “Kingdom Government and the Promise of Sheep Nations“, and after meeting guys like Basil and Gonz at a recent prophecy forum conference, has just been a guest on both Canary Cry Radio and Derek Gilbert’s “View from the Bunker” podcasts (both of which I listen to pretty regularly). This interview with Derek I found especially helpful in expounding upon what Dan is putting forth in his “Sheep Nations” teaching, (the Canary Cry interview is also great, but covered more of a variety of topics) and since it’s been something I’ve been meaning to look into myself for sometime now, it really helped push me to examine it closer. This is what I have basically found…

The eschatological teaching of “Sheep Nations” is for the most part based upon a specific interpretation of Jesus’s words in Matthew 25:31-46. Verses 32/33 say: “All the nations will be gathered before him, and he will separate the people one from another as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats.   He will put the sheep on his right and the goats on his left”, and so the claim is that because it says “all the nations will be gathered”, this means that it is actually the nations that will in fact be judged at this time, as some form of collective national or ethnic groupings, and not individuals being judged in the context of personal Salvation. Duval makes the statement that nowhere in this section does Jesus use the term “Salvation by grace through faith”, so this must mean that Jesus isn’t referring to Salvation at all, but in fact a totally different instance/type of future judgment. Hearing this particular interpretation of Matthew 25 was what first raised some serious red flags for me about this Sheep Nation thing…

The claim made by Duval, and other proponents of this teaching I found online, is that what Jesus is describing is not a judgment of faith, but of works, so then what they conclude is that the people being judged as the “Sheep” in verses 34-40 are actually nations who “fed/clothed/served Jesus” by physically showing compassion and giving aid to true Christians during the Tribulation, while not actually being Christians themselves. I find this whole idea so problematic it’s almost hard to know where to even begin!

First of all, the assertion that Jesus is describing a “works based judgment” and not judging based on faith, is first and foremost a false conclusion, and when you clear this away the rest of the argument really has nothing left to stand on anyway. Just because Jesus doesn’t use the term “grace through faith” doesn’t mean He isn’t still speaking to it, since we could probably look through the entirety of all four gospels and never see that actual phrase used by Christ ever. Does that mean that Jesus never taught such a thing, and that Paul only came up with it later? Of course not. You could use this type of reasoning and use it go back through everything Jesus said and twist it around to make everything a proclamation of a “works-based gospel”, but that would be totally inaccurate. What about the verses in James which talk about how faith without deeds is dead..?

In this interpretation, it is claimed that the “Sheep Nations” are not being judged in regard to Salvation, and thus are not actually being sentenced to heaven or hell, but their reward is to actually be able to go on as the living, reproducing mortal “citizens” of the Millennial reign of Christ which follows. Now, this is where the internal contradictions really start to become even more obvious, because to the alleged “Sheep nations” Jesus says, “Come, you who are blessed by my Father; take your inheritance, the kingdom prepared for you since the creation of the world”, and to the “Goat Nations” he says, “Depart from me, you who are cursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels”. The claim is that these judgments are not “salvific” or eternal in nature, but how could you seriously try and defend such a thing? So, the “Kingdom prepared for you since the creation of the world” is a “citizenship” in the Millennial reign of Christ for people who aren’t actually Saved…? And conversely, you would have to then logically assume that the people in the “goat nations” (who apparently are judged so because they didn’t feed/clothe/shelter Christians in the Tribulation) would be punished by not being “citizens” in the millennial kingdom, but have to be “outside” of it as mortals, except, they’re punished to eternal fires of hell…(!?)

This is really bizarre and self-contradictory, and ultimately is further proved to be incompatible with Jesus intended meaning when we read the last verse of the chapter, which simply and clearly says, “Then they will go away to eternal punishment, but the righteous to eternal life.” Boom. There it is. If the righteous are going on to “eternal life”, then you can’t try and say that the “righteous” in this instance are merely going on to mortal life as “citizens” in the earthly, Millennial reign of Christ, who can still die, and even eventually go on to follow Satan in his one last rebellion against Jesus in the Gog/Magog war at the end of the thousand years, and then get to hell with him. That’s really quite the exact opposite of “eternal life”!

But the Gog/Magog thing is really very much to the whole point, and after hearing Duval speak about this, the underlying motivations for holding to such a bizarre interpretation of Matthew 25 finally started to come into better focus. For the longest time, I really couldn’t figure it out. When I started looking into the origins of this “Sheep Nations” teaching, it seems to have been originated from 18th century Calvinist theologian John Gill, though it could have merely been popularized by him. In any case, the concept of sheep nations historically does seem to be an idea which lends itself to dispensationalism, premillennialism, and a pre-trib perspective on prophecy.

The Scofield reference Bible, the veritable primogenitor of Dispensationalism overall, says about Matthew 25, “This judgment is to be distinguished from the great white throne. Here there is no resurrection; the persons judged are living nations; no books are opened; three classes are present, sheep, goats, and brethren; the time is at the return of Christ; and the scene is on the earth. All these particulars are in contrast with Revelation 20:11-15.”

Now, this is where it gets really interesting, because Duval, (like myself) is actually solidly pre-Wrath, believing that the Church in it’s entirety (not just some handful of “left behind saints”) will experience persecution by the anti-Christ during the Tribulation, so in many ways, he is applying the sheep nation idea in what appears to be a newly adapted way. But, as was now made quite clear to me by listening to the interview with Derek Gilbert, Duval, despite being pre-wrath, is still very much locked into a Dispensational framework, and almost alarmingly so. At one point he actually says, “In the Old Testament days, salvation was through the Law, and then from the cross onward, it was through grace.” (paraphrasing) WHOA THERE! Not so fast… I actually yelled out so loud that people in the other room could here me when I listened to that. That is a serious misunderstanding, and really goes to show what is at the heart of Dispensationalism, and how it can actually work as a type of theological building block on top which all kinds of other false ideas can be placed.

Allegations of parallels with Dominionism have not surprisingly arisen, and have been summarily dismissed by Duval in several interviews, since to be fair, what he is describing can truly be said to be distinct from Dominionist theology, in the sense that it is not calling for a total conquest of the entire world by the Church in order to usher in Christ’s return. However… I would have to challenge anyone to explain to me how it couldn’t still be regarded as being akin to some type of “limited” or “partial Dominionism”, because, okay, even if you aren’t trying to infiltrate the “7 pillars of influence” in every country on Earth, aren’t you still basically talking about seeing the same happen on an individual nationalistic or ethnic basis…? Duval speaks of a “Goshen principle”, referring to how when the Israelites were in Egypt as it suffered the plagues, God spared them from his judgments upon Pharaoh, as if this demonstrates a convincing analogy of how God would then of course have to use individual nations, or people groups, or something, in order to take care of all the running, persecuted Christians in the Tribulation. Unfortunately, that analogy doesn’t work at all, because Goshen wasn’t actually a people group or city whose inhabitants protected the Israelites, it was simply the name of the “neighborhood” as it were where the Israelites lived in Egypt! It WAS in fact God’s pure, miraculous intervention which kept them safe from the boils, the darkness, the frogs, the bloody water, etc., safe from the angel who took the first born of the households without the blood on the doorpost… So instead of bolstering the argument that Christians in the End Times couldn’t survive the anti-Christ by pure Heavenly intervention, but would need some kind of earthly assistance (and this is really one of the core elements of his whole premise) I’d say it actually quite plainly refutes it.

I hope that most Christians wouldn’t need to have it spelled out for them why the concept of “Sheep and Goat nations” itself should be instantly recognized as dangerous, simply because of how such a thing can so easily and almost inevitably slide into the promotion of very unhealthy and extreme Nationalistic thinking. Unfortunately, in a country like the United States, merging zealous nationalism and pseudo-Christianity is pretty much the dominant religious reality, and so it really comes as no surprise to see that the teaching of “Sheep Nations” is commonly associated not only with Dispensationalism, but also closely with Christian Zionism

Jesus said “My Kingdom is not of this world”, but when you start trying to insert a concept like “sheep nations”, in which entire countries/ethnicities are somehow judged en masse, NOT according to faith but somehow by their collective works towards those who DO have faith, then I would argue that whether you realize it or not, you’re actually opening quite a nasty little Pandora’s box, where realistically, Christians are given a dualistic lens through which they are able to regard the world, in a manner that the Bible simply does not. I could probably write another post just as long as this one simply speculating on all the various ways this kind of teaching could be exploited by the Enemy towards deceiving the Faithful into putting their trust worldly governments, systems and people instead of God Himself, being falsely secure in the thought that they have managed to be part of a “sheep nation”, whether that was an entire nation/state somewhere, or just some small hidden enclave somewhere, some little “independent community” of people trying to hide and/or resist the anti-Christ’s New World Order.

Overall, I think the main point is that when you look at all the prophecy in scripture regarding the Last Days, in reality there is actually only a very tiny portion of it devoted to millennium whatsoever, and where it does mention it, there is nothing said which should compel us to feel the need to speculate on it’s nature to the degree that we start developing contrived eschatological theories about them which even run the risk of being contrary to the heart of the Gospel itself, simply to make something like the Millennium “make sense” in our own minds right now, especially from a skewed Dispensationalist mindset. The Bible doesn’t seem too concerned with us figuring out how the Millennium is going to “work”, or being able to identify who the people are who will be deceived by Satan on final time when he’s released from his prison after the thousand years is ended. In the chapter before Matthew 25, Jesus warns very explicitly about not being deceived in the time before His coming. I believe God absolutely CAN take care of His people, His bride, in the midst of any and all persecution, troubling times, chaotic natural disasters, etc., without relying whatsoever on human institutions, resources, or ingenuity.

After all, we remember that He took care of roughly a million people, for forty years in a barren DESERT, feeding them with food that came straight out of the SKY, and water that flowed straight out of a rock….

Walter Veith: The Secret Behind Secret Societies…

This guys is apparently a pretty prominent dude in the SDA church, but this presentation actually contains a lot of really solid info, and I really liked the way he puts it all together. The task of creating any synopsis of the broader New World Order/masonic/Luciferian system is no small feat, and each one has it’s strengths and weaknesses. This one actually touched upon several connections that were new to me, I recommend it to anyone, whether you’re brand new to learning about the NWO, or have known about it for some time…

Replacement, or Fulfillment…?

cross_temple“Replacement theology”. This is a charge leveled by proponents of Christian Zionism towards those who would dare question the dispensationalist teaching which asserts that Israel is “God’s chosen nation”, and that the most important aspect of this chosen status is the fact that “God promised them the Land”.

The New Testament of the Bible, from beginning to end, endeavors to explain how the mission of Jesus Christ was for God to take on human form, and die in the place of fallen sinful humanity, and rise again, in order that we might have the ability to experience new, resurrected Life ourselves, along with Christ in His Kingdom, if we put our faith in Him. This applies to every man, woman and child on the face of the earth, regardless of race, gender, nationality or age. However, this amazing and profound proclamation is rendered insufficient, and irrelevant, by those who still prefer to cling to concepts of “redemption”, “Messiah”, “kingdom” and “inheritance” which are earthly, and not eternal. This is what “Zionism” is all about, and the reason that “Dual-Covenant theology” was invented.

In the Bible, “Mount Zion” is the mountain of God, the “New Jerusalem”, a city “built not by human hands. (Heb 12:22/23, Heb 11:10, Acts 7:48/49, 2 Cor 5:1)

In this light, “Political Zionism” can really be seen as nothing short of trying to create “heaven on earth”.  This is the theology of “Dominionism”, the aim of bringing into being the occult axiom of “As Above, So Below“.

But getting back to “Replacement Theology”, the accusation which alleges that Christians who deny the existence of any “dual-covenant” are guilty of a most hideous and offensive error, because they are supposedly saying that the Church “replaced” Israel. This is simply a straw man argument, an attempt to discredit the opposing side by means of reframing the entire topic in a way that the Bible itself does not do. It is not a question of “replacing or not replacing”, it is a matter of “fulfilling or not fulfilling”…

The Old Testament is full of things which the New Testament declares to have been “shadows” of realities that are in fact eternal in nature, various forms of prophetic symbolism which in every single case were fulfilled by the Christ and His victory over death. (Hebrews 10)

Did the cross “replace” the sacrifices made on the altar of the Temple, or did it fulfill what was prophesied by the fact of what the sacrifices could never achieve themselves?

Did Christ’s teachings “replace” the Law, or did they fulfill the Law?

Did Jesus “replace” the Sacrifice God called Abraham to make of his son Isaac, or did He fulfill what was prophesied by the ram caught in the thicket?

Did John the Baptist “replace” the prophet Elijah, or did he fulfill what was prophesied about the “Elijah that is to come”?

Did Jesus “replace” Melchizedek, or did he fulfill what was prophesied through the person of Melchizedek and the type of priesthood he held?

Did Jesus’ resurrection “replace” Jonah being spat out of the whale, or Joseph being brought out of the Egyptian prison cell, or did it fulfill what was prophesied through their lives?

Did Jesus “replace” the Ark which saved Noah and his family from the Flood, or did He fulfill what was prophesied and portrayed, as the only way to be saved from eternal death and separation from God…?

The Law. The Prophets. The Patriarchs. The Temple. The Sacrifices. The Priesthood. The festivals. The Sabbaths. The food regulations. The New Moon celebrations. The rite of circumcision. The judges. The Israelite monarchy.

Practically everything which combines into all that can be considered that which constitutes “Israel”, serves a single, profound purpose. “These are a shadow of the things that were to come; the reality, however, is found in Christ.” (Col. 2:17)

This was the teaching which infuriated the scribes and Pharisees to the point of screaming and gnashing their teeth in rage, and prompted the Pharisees to hunt down and kill the followers of Jesus for decades after His resurrection and ascension. This is the teaching which still flies in the face of modern Judaism (i.e. the Talmudic Rabbinic tradition, the ancestor of Pharisaical Judaism) to this very day. The whole notion of “dual covenant theology” is contradictory to the teachings of Jesus, the content of everything the N.T. writers said, and contrary to very heart of God. The only way Christians can swayed by the false teachings of modern prophecy “scholars” who cite singular, out-of-context verses like “Israel is the apple of His eye” is if they do not bother to stop and read the scriptures, in their entirety, for themselves. This is what false teaching has always relied upon, from the very beginning, and so it is now.

God of course is still in control. The things going on today in the land of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob are still part and parcel to God’s prophetic master plan. 1948 was not necessarily the glorious recreation of the “Promised Kingdom” as Zionists claim it to be, but it didn’t catch God off guard either! The point is that through it all, we must never allow ourselves to get fooled by people who would seek to confuse the “copies and shadows of what it is heaven” with the realities themselves. (Heb 8:5)

The Church is not a “replacement” for Israel, because “Israel”, in the temporal, earthly sense, was a “shadow of what was to come”, the Kingdom of Heaven.

I Just Couldn’t Help Myself…

I never do this. I swear I don’t. Ok, I RARELY do it. But today I did, and I didn’t hold anything back. It was because it was something that touched upon a particular nerve that, I confess, really is hard for me not to react to. It shoots to the core of so much of what I have labored in and wrestled with and battled over in my own heart and mind. It’s what you might call a “pet peave”, but then again, “peave” doesn’t really come close to describing how this particular attitude and mindset amongst Christians continues to aggravate me, to an ever-increasing degree, whenever I come across it. I came across it today here:

CONSPIRACY THEORIES. DON’T.

It reads as follows…

Conspiracy Theories. Don’t.

Should you pay attention to that idea of a conspiracy theory? Let’s dive into the Deeper Waters and find out.

Okay. I know right up that conspiracies do happen. People do try to cover things up and pull them off together. Usually however, we have some idea that this is definitely going on. Eventually, it all comes down on those who do it. For instance, Watergate was a conspiracy of sorts, and frankly, it didn’t really last too long.

The main conspiracies I’m talking about are the kind that are popularized by too many Christians and are also the same mindset found in a number of atheistic circles. For Christians, these often involves “satanic plots” to control our children and indoctrinate them. Much of the time, you know that the Illuminati has to be behind it all!

Because, you know, the main way to send that secret message is to go through the half time show on Super Bowl Sunday. How is it that the Illuminati managed to reach all these dancers and send a secret message to people watching the Super Bowl? Before going off on how it is something you think is part of hidden satanic symbolism, why not just consider something else?

Maybe it’s just a tasteless performance.

Now this is saying nothing about the morality of what goes on in said performances. I am not at all endorsing that. What I am saying is that you need to be on the watch for thinking that there are several conspiracies afoot. For a Christian, this can result in a heightened paranoia and to the rest of the world, you just look ridiculous. We already look ridiculous for believing in Jesus. There’s no reason to add to that.

Atheists don’t always do much better. You can think about plots in Christianity to destroy everything that disagreed with Christianity and then of course, the process of canonization, that was all just a total plot! Very rarely is any actual real historical study done on the topic. Unfortunately in our internet age, too many people find something on the internet and think it’s true. We all laugh at the idea of “I read it on the internet so it must be true”, but too many people have that same mindset.

The thinking also leads to a heightened arrogance. Sure, everyone else misses the main message, but I know what it is. I am not going to be fooled the way everyone else is. If you do not see it, well you just haven’t really reached this level of insight and thinking. Of course, a possibly even worse case could be that you’re part of the conspiracy.

One point to keep in mind when researching these claims is see who is being cited as a source. Too many times conspiracy theorists regularly cite each other and validate one another’s claims. Try to find a source that you think will be as objective as possible. Of course, total objectivity could be impossible, but try to get as close as you can.

For Christians also, please especially avoid conspiracies related to end times madness. I have seen too many times the idea of secretly implanting chips in us that are supposed to be the Mark of the Beast. Honestly, I have reached the point where my eyes just start rolling immediately at this. It’s not just because I’m a preterist. If you’re a futurist, you should avoid this as well.

There are far too many important things to study than the idea of possible conspiracies. If some Christians would seek to interpret their Bible as well as they try to interpret a show at halftime on Super Bowl Sunday, we’d all be better off.

In Christ,

Nick Peters

(my response is as follows…)

So, you basically see the apex of “paranoid Christian conspiracy theories” as centering around things like Satanic messaging embedded in Super Bowl half-time shows..?

I guess you can’t be faulted for that. There are after all bajillions of youtube videos which invest themselves in exposing and decoding such things.

However, I must interject as to your overall resistance to Christians being too “paranoid” about Satanic conspiracies in general. Since you clearly seem to be writing from the perspective of a Christian yourself, I am curious as to how exactly you parse this out, in relation to what the Bible actually has to say about Satan and his intentions towards this planet and the entire human race….

You make a rather puzzling statement how even though you’re a preterist, you believe that futurists should avoid getting sucked into “end time madness” as well. Not sure how you can claim to not have a certain amount of bias on that one, but no matter. As a preterist, how exactly DO you see history playing out, might I ask? Are we just going to keep “progressing forward” as things get better and better? Is there no Second Coming of Christ at all in your view?

Anyhow… Your article is more or less built around the typical argument of “Well of course conspiracy happens, but hey, they’re small and easy to spot, and so we should be able to make a distinction between those “realistic” examples of conspiracy, and the full on “crazy” ones…” (is that a fair description?) Yet, there are much bigger “substantiated” examples of massive-scale conspiracies than Watergate, and far more sinister as well…

Hitler and the Nazis “conspired” to eradicate Jews and the “non-desirables” from Europe (and ultimately, the world) through the implementation of a highly organized system whose sole function was to destroy human life with assembly-line efficiency. (I suppose you don’t think there was anything “satanic” going on with any of that…?) The rest of the world allegedly had no knowledge of this massive program (there were rumors, of course, but to believe in them would’ve mean believing a pretty intense “conspiracy theory”)

The Manhattan Project involved thousands upon thousands of people all working on various aspects of a project whose intention was to create the most devastating weapon the world had ever seen. It was as though an entire city was all working together on a singular secret project, yet the rest of the American public was completely unaware the whole time, until later when the project was disclosed.

The Federal Reserve as well was formed in secret, and confessed by the men who created it as something they “conspired” to do, using all sorts of chicanery to put the production of the U.S. dollar into their private control. (The “Federal Reserve” is definitively NOT a Federal institution, but a private bank). This is not “theory”, but open, documented fact.

But as to your question about “How is it that the Illuminati managed to reach all these dancers and send a secret message to people watching the Super Bowl?” The answer to that one is really quite simple, in that you obviously don’t need to brainwash every dancer on a stage for a performance filled with Satanic symbolism. (duh!) Every music video, every stage performance, and for that matter, every film, tv show, news program, etc., is produced, directed, and edited by a comparatively small number of people. Those are the people who can put whatever symbolism, message, meaning, or imagery they choose into anything they produce…. The people dancing and singing and acting and reading the teleprompters are really just living puppets.

But finally, as to your point about our belief in Jesus making us look “ridiculous” to the rest of the world…

You’d better believe the world is going to think you’re “ridiculous” for believing in Him, and if you think that’s something you need to try and mitigate as much as possible, then wow, that frightens me…

Think about it. You lament how Christians need to better interpret their Bibles, but when we pick up the Bible and actually read it, it is full of the most “fantastic” stories and ideas and claims you could imagine. It claims that God made man and woman, put em in a garden, then some serpent/devil creature comes along and tells them to eat it, and if they do, they’ll become like God, become “enlightened”, so they do it, but they don’t become gods, only trapped by sin, and then they realize they’re nude, get kicked out of the garden, etc., etc., God later floods the whole earth yet saves eight people. He raises up a people to be His own, saving them through plagues and miracles and seas that split in two and water that pours out of rocks. He smashes cities with parades and trumpets. He kills giants with pebbles. He turns kings into beasts, and makes other beasts speak. He closes the mouths of hungry lions, keeps people singe-free in fiery pits, and takes people on underwater ocean cruises inside the stomach of aquatic wildlife. Then this “Jesus guy” comes along, and whoa baby, does HE ever do some weird stuff. Making the blind see, the lame walk, casting out these invisible spirit things who apparently were taking control of people all over the place… He even was killed, and then was claimed to have risen from the DEAD and could walk through walls and teleport and such. Then they say He floated up into the sky, back to “heaven”, after which His followers stayed here and told everyone about it, and cast out these invisible evil things that are supposedly flying around everywhere, but we can’t see or hear them, and this Jesus guy is supposedly still alive and even “coming back” one day, yet, in this totally crazy book at the end, it talks about this “dragon” character and how he’s totally been fighting against this Jesus dude the whole time, and is going to try and kill everyone who loves him, and is even at some point going to gather “all the kinds of the earth” to make war against Him……

Yet… You don’t at all see the Bible itself that fully encompasses the “fantastic” and even the “conspiratorial”……?
(end of my original comment)

Now, there are only a couple other points I’d want to add to my already ridiculously long retort to this article.  First, to the pred-purple-jellyfish-crossota-millsae_10670_600x450oint insinuating that “conspiracy theorists” are guilty of the mindset “I read it on the internet so it must be true”.  You hear this all the time, and it’s really a sucker-punch, a pathetic attempt to discredit information or ideas by pointing to the fact that the internet played a part in the exchange of this information and ideas.  It’s really quite a tired and poor argument, honestly.  Never mind the irony that this accusation is itself being put forth in a blog post, on the internet (so should we disregard the author altogether as total nonsense because he’s sharing his thoughts online?) but the underlying implication going on here is that of course the people looney enough to believe in grandiose “conspiracy theories” or in such nonsense as the “illuminati” couldn’t actually have done their due diligence and looked for a weighty compilation of independent yet agreeing sources, or well-examined and authenticated evidence, no, they must have simply watched some youtube video made by some unemployed, anti-social middle-aged bum living in their parent’s basement.  It’s just substituting insult for argument.  Such accusations and ad hominem attacks come from people who have never even heard of, let alone looked into themselves, such vast compositions of true, bona fide research and data-analysis as found in things like Architects and Engineers for 9/11 Truth.  (oh wait, sorry, that’s a link for a website, and if it’s on the internet, it must be baloney…) 😉  I guess that’s why corporations, governments, media outlets, etc. all have chosen to eschew putting their information online as well, because it would only serve to discredit them….(!?)

deep-sea-creatures-002Secondly, there is the other common claim that “this thinking also leads to a heightened arrogance”.  It’s funny, because this is exactly the SAME sort of thing you hear on a regular basis from atheists and other non-Christians who find your claim that the Jesus is the only way to God, that heaven and hell are real, and that all the other religions are false and deceptive to be the absolute epitome of arrogance!  All the belief systems are wrong, and deceived, and leading people to hell?  Why, what narcissism!  What gall!  As though the people who have come to put their faith in Christ and His word have done so simply as a function of their own internal desire to be above everyone else, to condemn them, and have some sort of self-created sense of exclusivity in the world…  Yes, atheists can be pretty adept at smacking Christians around with this one, and yet Christians will then turn right around and use the exact same logic to try and silence their brothers and sisters who they find to be totally off the deep end…fish

But alas, I AM off the “deep end”, learning to embrace the tides of life and let the currents take me, instead of hiding in my own little cove and pretending that entire roaring ocean doesn’t exist.  And the further I go into those “Deeper Waters” Mr. Peters, the deeper they seem to get.  The weirder, and crazier and more amazing and beautiful and scary and awesome and almost unbelievable they become.  Only HE can plumb the depths of all that is and has been and will be in this vast and incredible universe that He has made, but He has promised to be with us, always, as we swim through even the darkest, and deepest, and most shark-infested of waters…

 

ISIS and The Greater Israel Project…

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Recently, I learned about a fascinating document titled “A Strategy for Israel in the Nineteen Eighties” by Israeli journalist Oded Yinon. The article originally appeared in Kivunim (Directions), the journal of the Department of Information of the World Zionist Organization, and essentially outlines the Israeli plan to gain total hegemony in the region and eventually achieve the realization of “Greater Israel”.

The foreward to the translation of this document, written by Israel Shahak, outlines the main points projected by the body of the piece:

1. The idea that all the Arab states should be broken down, by Israel, into small units, occurs again and again in Israeli strategic thinking. For example, Ze’ev Schiff, the military correspondent of Ha’aretz (and probably the most knowledgeable in Israel, on this topic) writes about the “best” that can happen for Israeli interests in Iraq: “The dissolution of Iraq into a Shi’ite state, a Sunni state and the separation of the Kurdish part” (Ha’aretz 6/2/1982). Actually, this aspect of the plan is very old.palestinian-land-grab-jewish-bloc-settlement-conquering-palestine-israel-netanyahu-west-bank

2. The strong connection with Neo-Conservative thought in the USA is very prominent, especially in the author’s notes. But, while lip service is paid to the idea of the “defense of the West” from Soviet power, the real aim of the author, and of the present Israeli establishment is clear: To make an Imperial Israel into a world power. In other words, the aim of Sharon is to deceive the Americans after he has deceived all the rest.

3. It is obvious that much of the relevant data, both in the notes and in the text, is garbled or omitted, such as the financial help of the U.S. to Israel. Much of it is pure fantasy. But, the plan is not to be regarded as not influential, or as not capable of realization for a short time. The plan follows faithfully the geopolitical ideas current in Germany of 1890-1933, which were swallowed whole by Hitler and the Nazi movement, and determined their aims for East Europe. Those aims,
ISIS_Logo

especially the division of the existing states, were carried out in 1939-1941, and only an alliance on the global scale prevented their consolidation for a period of time.

Now, as you start to understand this tactic of breaking up the surrounding Arab states and keeping them in a perpetual, weakened state of sectarian fighting and borderline anarchy, the recent developments of all that has occurred in the Middle East since 9/11, and the sudden appearance of the latest terrorist boogeyman “ISIS”, start to make a lot more sense….